Chef Q&A

Incorporating Melons into Your Menu

Q: Cantaloupes, honeydews, and watermelons are at their flavor peak—how do you use them?

I serve Ready-Set-Serve (RSS) Cantaloupe Chunks with salty prosciutto or country ham and crisp Italian breadsticks. Watermelon works well with Feta cheese, red onions, and mint. And I pair honeydew melon balls with ice cold Baileys Liqueur and French vanilla ice cream for a sweet dessert.

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Late-Summer Veggies

Q: What is your favorite late-summer vegetable? How do you serve it?

Up here in the Great White North, late summer/autumn is a little different than in California or Florida, so I will say: roasted beets and parsnips with garlic, thyme, sea salt and cracked black pepper…all day, every day! 

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Produce to Grill

Q: It’s grilling season—what are your favorite produce items on the grill?

Coming from a classic French/Italian culinary background, I’m very fond of grilling rainbow peppers, Portabella mushrooms, yellow squashes, and zucchini that have been marinated in basil, garlic, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper. More recently I’ve been grilling/charring broccoli, green onions, and shiitake mushrooms marinated in sesame oil, rice vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, ginger, cilantro, and lemon grass. 

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Fresh Produce in Burgers

Q: Burgers are more popular—and varied—than ever. How do you incorporate fresh produce in your burger menus?

My go-to burger accompaniments are Ready-Set-Serve (RSS) Better Burger Leaf, vine-ripe or heirloom tomatoes seasoned with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper, and RSS Sliced Red Onions. If I’m making the classic Aussie burger, I add grilled pineapple, double-smoked Canadian bacon, pickled beets, and a sunny-side up fried egg.

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Using Summer Tomatoes

Q: Summer tomatoes are full of flavor. What is your favorite raw preparation?

I keep it simple. Summer tomatoes are so delicious, they can be eaten like apples. For my Italian tomato salad, I toss a variety of colored tomatoes with MFC Basil, olive oil, Ready-Set-Serve (RSS) Peeled Garlic, RSS Sliced Red Onions, balsamic vinegar, and a dash of salt and pepper. It’s a classic that everyone loves.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Summer Breakfasts

Q: Breakfast continues to be one of the most successful day parts. Now that the warmer months are upon us, how do you adjust morning recipes?

We serve fruits like berries, melons, and peaches cold or toss them in smoothies rather than warming them up for the pancakes and waffle toppers or hot cereals.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Using Produce & Herbs in Summer Cocktails

Q: Using fresh produce and herbs in cocktails is de rigueur in many circles. What ingredients do you pair with summer drinks?

I love hollowing out whole fruits to use them as vessels to hold drinks. I use pineapples, coconuts, and most melons—with lots of ice and fresh sage—to a create refreshing summer cocktails.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Grilling with Produce

Q: It’s BBQ season—what produce side dishes do you pair with this fare?

I would say there is nothing better than grilled corn on the cob seasoned with a house blend of BBQ spices. I like to get a good char on the kernels for extra flavor. They pair well with chicken wings, burgers, and steaks.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Favorite Summer Fruit

Q: What is your favorite summer fruit and how do you like to use it?

I like to season seedless watermelons with salt, pepper, and garlic, then grill and use them in place of tomatoes in my watermelon caprese salad topped with Champagne vinaigrette, Ready-Set-Serve (RSS) Wild Arugula, gorgonzola cheese, and crushed pistachios.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Robust Spice Blends

Q: The popularity of spicy flavors shows no signs of abating. What are your favorites?

I season vegetables with robust spice blends like chipotle, harissa, or shawarma mix before grilling. These bold flavors add another dimension to vegetables and summer salads.

Jeffrey Merry, Reinhart Foodservice

Bold Flavors

Q: Unique, bold flavors are at the top of the trend list—what are your go-to ingredients to draw customers?

I suggest transforming thinly sliced cucumbers into bread and butter pickles. In general I like substituting pickled or marinated vegetable combinations for fries. Another great combination is citrus with spicy chiles—together they create a ying-yang flavor contrast.

Jeffrey Merry, Reinhart Foodservice

Warm-Weather Salads

Q: As temperatures climb, green salads become a menu focus. What are your favorite spring and summer salad ingredients?

I like to combine lettuces like arugula, baby greens, romaine, and spinach with grilled vegetables such as asparagus, squash, and tomatoes. I give these salads balance with a hint of sweetness from fruits like blueberries and strawberries.

Jeffrey Merry, Reinhart Foodservice

Must-Haves for Father's Day Menus

Q: Which produce items are must-haves for Father’s Day menus?

Tomatoes, corn on the cob, strawberries and watermelon are my favorite ways of adding flavor and color to what is traditionally a meat-centric holiday. Times are changing and families are making healthier choices when eating out. I like to grill these produce items to give them a smoky char and serve them as side dishes or salads.

Jeffrey Merry, Reinhart Foodservice

Healthy Drive-Thru Dining

Q: Fast food is getting even more competition with the increase in healthy drive-thru dining. What dishes do you feel lend themselves to take out and to-go options?
Everyone is “on the go” these days, looking for a quick bite they can take with them. They are focused on healthy food over heavily processed options. Offer these guests wraps or spring rolls filled with vegetables and that have a flavorful soy- or tamari-based dipping sauce or a spread on the inside. 
 
Include items that will lend a crunch for texture, juiciness, and flavor at the same time. Romaine lettuce, Sugar Snap peas, shredded carrots, cucumber, lime, and cilantro wrapped in rice paper that has been soaked. Add some nuts or shrimp if you like.
 
Soups and broths like Vietnamese Pho are all the rage these days. Packed full of vegetables, with or without meat or seafood, they are very profitable.
 
Good eating!
Chef Patrick Mitchell, Ben E. Keith Foods

Photogenic Food

Q: Photogenic food is said to boost sales. In this age of Instagram, what ingredients do you suggest for maximum photo exposure?

Food pictures are the most shared photos on the internet! It is amazing how many people are taking pictures of dishes while they are out to eat, just so they can post them and let the world see what they are eating. Knowing that, make sure your food POPS when you serve it. That is free publicity for your restaurant! Anything that has great contrast or looks like you just want to “eat the picture” is what sells - things like roasted Brussels Sprouts with a balsamic drizzle; fresh tomato, basil and Mozzarella (Caprese salad); watermelon and Feta cheese salad with fresh mint. Fresh fruits and vegetables work great in these photos!

Good eating!

Chef Patrick Mitchell, Ben E. Keith Foods

Mother's Day Dish

Q: What is your favorite Mother’s Day dish?
Having spent 33 years in hotels, you can imagine the number of Mother’s Day brunch items I have made, but I also think about what my own mother liked and what my brothers and sister would cook up for her at that time of year. She loved strawberries and rhubarb and we grew rhubarb in the back yard. We would make strawberry rhubarb pie, or a salad with strawberries and rhubarb and fresh mint with some sugar and orange juice, add a few nuts for texture...delicious! My mother also loved Quiche; we would make many versions with either broccoli, spinach, onions, green onions, or a combination of all. 
 
Frittatas are a great Mothers Day recipe, since they are pretty much an “open faced” omelet. Sautee up the veggies you want as your filling and then add in the mixture of eggs and milk. Cook it slowly over low heat, being careful not to burn the bottom, then finish it in the oven or under a salamander.
 
Good eating!
Chef Patrick Mitchell, Ben E. Keith Foods

Filipino Cuisine

Q: Filipino foods are rising in popularity. This cuisine is traditionally meat-heavy…what produce dishes do you suggest?
Filipino culture has had a very diverse influence over the ages which has had an impact on the traditional cuisine of the country. You can see influences from China, Spain, France, Southeast Asia, and even the United States. Filipino cuisine has some wonderful dishes that highlight vegetables along with the meat or seafood. One such dish is called “Lumpiang Sariwa” also known as a “Fresh Egg Roll” They start by cooking a mixture of tomato, garlic, onions and ground pork. Then they add in shredded jicama, sweet potatoes, and carrots. They cook this for a few minutes and then add in shredded cabbage just until it wilts. Remove from the stove and allow it to drain in a colander as it cools. Place a leaf of lettuce on a spring roll wrapper and fill with the cooled filling. Wrap it by folding the bottom up then the 2 sides around so the one end is open and the lettuce leaf is protruding. These are drizzled with Hoisin Sauce or sprinkled with chopped nuts.
 
Broths that are laden with vegetables and either shrimp or some type of meat are also very popular.
 
Good eating!
Chef Patrick Mitchell, Ben E. Keith Foods

Mitigating Food Waste

Q: Food waste is a huge problem in our industry. How do you suggest operators utilize Markon Essentials items?

I always recommend that operators look at whole vegetables the same way grandmothers look at chickens—nothing is ever wasted. Take a head of Markon Essentials Cauliflower. Are we lumping all of the florets into the same dish or are we separating the largest for roasting, the smaller ones for pickling, and the stems for shaving into slaws or vegan “pappardelle”? 2016 Maines Food Show Presenter Alex Talbot of Ideas in Food even demonstrated how the small nubs of cauliflower (where the florets met the stalk) could be scooped out and seared like bay scallops! With a little perspective and creativity, food waste can be quickly transformed into memorable meals, revenue, and profit. 

Chef: Eamon Lee
Chef Eamon Lee, Maines Paper & Food Service

Using Fresh Herbs

Q: What are your favorite fresh herbs? How do you use them?

My favorites will always be a mix of three parts parsley and one part each thyme, chervil (or tarragon), and chives. That combination will always take me back to New York City in the mid-90s and the Park Avenue Cafe. It was their version of fines herbes and although a little different than the French stalwart, it was every bit as delicious. We used that blend to finish light pan sauces to accompany proteins such as beef, chicken, duck, fish, and shellfish like lobster. 

Chef: Eamon Lee
Chef Eamon Lee, Maines Paper & Food Service

Global Cuisine

Q: Global cuisines have never been more popular. Which world region is your favorite? What is your go-to dish?

I’m beguiled by Korean flavors, and am still unapologetically obsessed with gochujang. Toss RSS Baby Kale Mix with gochujang, RSS Lime Juice, sea salt, and RSS Washed & Trimmed Cilantro—then pair with cooked rice and pickled RSS Shredded Carrots and Cabbage. These ingredients are a great base for the very popular bowl trend sweeping the country. 

Chef: Eamon Lee
Chef Eamon Lee, Maines Paper & Food Service

RSS Heritage Blend

Q: How do you use Ready-Set-Serve (RSS) Heritage Blend?

RSS Heritage Blend is the perfect blend of red and green lettuce varieties—and the leaf shapes and textures hold wonderfully in both traditionally and progressively composed presentations. The sweeter flavor profile really lends itself to practically any preparation. It’s quickly taking the place of commodity-driven blends on many of my customer’s menus. 

Chef: Eamon Lee
Markon Member Chef

Favorite Middle-Eastern Flavors

Q: What are your favorite Middle Eastern flavors? How do you use them with produce-centric dishes?

When it comes to Middle Eastern flavors, I gravitate towards traditional ingredients like citrus, olives, and olive oil, and blends like sumac, zaatar, and harissa. I like to put a spin on traditional dishes like tabbouleh and fattoush by substituting parsley and common lettuce varieties with products like RSS Kale Color Crunch and RSS Shredded Kale  Blend. The difference that RSS products make in traditional recipes is amazing. 

Chef: Eamon Lee
Chef Eamon Lee, Maines Paper & Food Service

Reducing Kitchen Waste

Q: The imperfect fruits and vegetable trend is helping reduce waste…what other ways do you suggest reducing produce waste in foodservice kitchens?

There are so many uses for imperfect fruits and vegetables. I like to pickle cauliflower, carrots, chile peppers, and green beans. I also suggest making spicy chutneys, fruit compotes, pureed soups, and dessert sauces.

Good eating!

Chef Stephen Renaud, Gordon Food Service Canada

Markon First Crop Broccoli Crowns

Q: What is your favorite Markon First Crop product? How do you prepare/serve it?

I love using Markon First Crop Broccoli Crowns. I chop them finely and fold them into a delicious broccoli soufflé topped with strawberry crème fraiche. It always delights customers—and is a huge success.

Good eating!

Chef Stephen Renaud, Gordon Food Service Canada

Valentine's Day Meals

Q: What ingredients do you use for romantic meals served on Valentine’s Day?

On Valentine’s Day, I slice Ready-Set-Serve Avocado Halves like a fan place over lobster mousse. I top it all with a melting foie gras cube—delicious!

Good eating!

Chef Stephen Renaud, Gordon Food Service Canada

2017 Trends

Q: What trend are you looking forward to experimenting with in 2017?

The veg-centric trend is big and I’m looking forward to promoting the values and benefits of this movement here. I plan to experiment with some of Markon's new products like Ready-Set-Serve Cauli Creations and specialty items like Chinese long beans.

Good eating!

Chef Stephen Renaud, Gordon Food Service Canada

Serving Avocados

Q: Avocados are packed with good fats-beyond Super Bowl guacamole, how do you serve these delicious fruits?

Avocados are a staple for most of Texas. Because they have such subtle flavor, I give them a boost with citrus juice and/or zest, fresh herbs, exotic salts, EVOO, garlic, fresh mango, passion fruit, and fresh ground peppercorns. Avocados pair well with crabmeat, cucumbers, tuna tartare, shrimp, soups, sauces, and purees. They add brightness to any dish, from a quenelle for garnish to a mousse as a base for a crab salad appetizer.

Good eating!

Chef Chris Cukjati, Ben E. Keith Foods

Produce Items in Hot Soups

Q: Hot soups like ramen and pho have exploded to cult status. What are your favorite produce items in these dishes?

I prefer rich umami flavors like Cremini and Portabella mushrooms that have been seared at high heat (to capture moisture and flavor). Also great are fresh micro cilantro, sliced jalapeno chiles, charred cabbage, green onion, daikon radishes, eggplants, hearty greens, seaweed salad, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, and cauliflower florets.

Good eating!

Chef Chris Cukjati, Ben E. Keith Foods

Produce-Seafood Pairings

Q: Sustainable seafood is hot right now. What vegetables do you pair with this category?

I like to incorporate flavors like Butternut squash, roasted shallot, Thai curry paste, and coconut curry puree, hearty greens, root vegetable purees, roasted fingerling potatoes, or ancient grains such as farro as a base for fish served in wide, shallow bowls. Also try pairing a mild fish with cauliflower florets, EVOO, melted butter, garam masala, turmeric, onions, and garlic; roast until a deep caramelization and crunchy texture develops.

Good eating!

Chef Chris Cukjati, Ben E. Keith Foods

Transforming Salads for Cold-Weather Menus

Q: How do you transform salads for cold-weather menus?

Always look for earthy greens such as arugula, kale, and chard tops; add in roasted nuts, beets, goat cheese, and tender pieces of protein. I believe this is the time to showcase knife-garnish skills and add a crunch factor to develop savory flavors and citrus finishes. Another way to add dimension is to toss small grape, multi-color, or cherry tomatoes with EVOO, garlic, fresh herbs (thyme, marjoram, or oregano), then bake at a low temperature until tender—cool and toss into these hearty salads.

Good eating!

Chef Chris Cukjati, Ben E. Keith Foods

Trends for 2017

Q: What do you think will be this year’s trendiest item?

Meals served in bowls that cross global boundaries with different flavor combinations will only grow in popularity. Also on the rise are cooking methods such as charring, pickling, toasting, smoking, and braising. Expect more condiment choices, ranging from romesco to chimichurri, to bring color and bolder flavors to dishes across the menu.

Good eating!

Chef Chris Cukjati, Ben E. Keith Foods

Swiss Chard

Q: Which produce item do you hope gains more popularity in 2017?

I would love to see Swiss chard gain some more popularity in 2017. It’s not only beautiful and flavorful all on its own, but it’s a very versatile ingredient in many different recipes as well.

Good eating!

Chef: Paul Young
Chef Paul Young, Reinhart Foodservice

Stick-to-Your-Ribs Fall Recipe

Q: Stick-to-your-ribs recipes are in season. What is your favorite hearty dish?

I like to roast Acorn squash halves until tender, mash the inside and fill with barbecued pulled chicken, caramelized onions, kale, and pine nuts. It’s always a hit!

Good eating!

Chef: Paul Young
Chef Paul Young, Reinhart Foodservice

Holiday Brussels Sprouts

Q: What's your favorite holiday recipe to serve?

My favorite holiday recipe is shaved Brussels sprouts and bacon sautéed with balsamic glaze and blistered cherry tomatoes. It combines earthy, salty, and sweet flavors for great balance.

Good eating!

Chef: Paul Young
Chef Paul Young, Reinhart Foodservice

Vegetarian Holiday Entree

Q: What do you suggest for a vegetarian holiday entrée?

I suggest eggplant parmesan. It's a great dish that can be served a la carte or for sharing. I also love the dish because it is very versatile, yet is a comfort food for many.

Good eating!

Chef: Paul Young
Chef Paul Young, Reinhart Foodservice

Adding Umami to Dishes

Q: How do you add umami flavors to recipes?

I mash some anchovies into simmering garlic and oil that creates a paste that I add to many vegetable dishes. The natural salt adds amazing umami essence and great hidden flavor to the dish. Parmesan cheese, roasted mushrooms, and tomato paste are also great ways to enhance this taste experience.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Updating Holiday Classics

Q: How do you upgrade classics like cranberry relish for today’s holiday diner?

I add orange zest and deglaze with Grand Marnier. Try blistering some whole cranberries for a colorful garnish. Other delicious add-ins include apples, cinnamon, ginger, horseradish, jalapeno chile peppers, pears, pomegranate seeds, or walnuts. I like to use whole berries, but pureeing is also a good option.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Using Winter Squash

Q: Hard squashes are packed with sweet flavor and hearty texture. Which is your favorite and how do you serve it?

I prefer Butternut squash. Roast it with a bit of butter, brown sugar, nutmeg, and maple syrup—that’s how my mamma made it. Simple, but amazing. Delicata is another great choice—the skins are so thin, they can be eaten as well. I often chop it up and simmer in bean soups.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Holiday Veggie Sides

Q: The holiday season is upon us…what are your favorite vegetable side dishes?

I love pumpkin either roasted or served as a soup with burgers and sandwiches. I like to toss pumpkin chunks and Ready-Set-Serve® (RSS) Sliced Onions with cumin, cayenne, and olive oil, roast until tender, drizzle with pomegranate molasses, and finally sprinkle with RSS Washed & Trimmed Cilantro. Another favorite is to saute chopped pumpkin and Markon First Crop Red Bell Peppers, deglaze with mixture of soy sauce, mirin, Chinese five-spice powder, RSS Peeled Garlic, and minced ginger, and simmer until glaze is thick. I serve this with a choice of brown or white rice.

Good eating!

Chef: Vic Vegas
Chef Vic Vegas, Nicholas & Company

Fall Vegetables

Q: What is your favorite fall vegetable and how do you like to use it?

I like working with sweet potatoes and fall squashes like Kabocha and Hubbard because they work well with different types of cuisine. My favorites include miso-glazed Kabocha squash, roasted pumpkin with harissa, sweet potato puree with toasted cumin and hoja santa, and Hubbard soup with braised pork belly.

Good eating!

Chef: Jeremy Glas
Chef Jeremy Glas, Shamrock Foods Company

Adding Umami with Mushrooms

Q: Mushrooms have done wonders for reducing fat and calories in meat-based burgers. What other ways do you use mushrooms to add fiber and flavor while reducing fat?

I’ve always added a kind of duxelle to my meatloaf that I cook down with some Tamari soy sauce to add umami and salty flavors, as well as moisture to the loaf. My other favorite thing to do with mushrooms is to slice them thin and roast in low heat to make “chips” out of them. It’s a great garnish for salads, mushroom soups, and compound butters.

Good eating!

Chef: Jeremy Glas
Chef Jeremy Glas, Shamrock Foods Company

Middle Eastern Flavors

Q: What are your favorite Middle Eastern flavors? How do you use them with produce-centric dishes?

I’m really getting into harissa sauces and seasonings as well as baharat spice. Both can be used in potato and squash dishes—both baked and pureed. Baharat is especially good with tomatoes and tomato sauces—it makes a very interesting ratatouille.

Good eating!

Chef: Jeremy Glas
Chef Jeremy Glas, Shamrock Foods Company

Fall Pies

Q: It’s pie season—which produce items are your favorites to use in these flaky desserts?

Well, I don’t think anything can beat a great cherry pie, but I recently made a peach pie where I grilled the fruit before baking to add another layer of flavor. I also love traditional sweet potato pie made with Okinawan sweet potatoes. The bright purple color and surprising earthy/sweet flavor is incomparable.

Good eating!

Chef: Jeremy Glas
Chef Jeremy Glas, Shamrock Foods Company

Cabbage Dishes

Q: Cabbage used to be overlooked, but with the popularity of kimchi and other fermented dishes, it has gained menu clout. How do you like to cook it?

I’m a big fan of European preparations such as German sauerkrauts, Rotkohl, and Russian kvashenaya kapusta. Done well, these are all perfect complements to proteins like sausages and game. I enjoy making colcannon too—the cabbage adds more dimension to this potato dish with a punch of umami.

Good eating!

Chef: Jeremy Glas
Chef Jeremy Glas, Shamrock Foods Company

House-Made Spreads

Q: House-made spreads like chutney, jams, and jellies help establish authenticity—what is your favorite and what is it served with?

I use a spread of MFC Strawberries, rhubarb, and bacon jam on one side of the bun of a wagyu beef burger; I pile the other side of the bun with peanut butter and RSS Heritage Blend. It’s adventurous and unexpected, but delicious!

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Savory Apple Dishes

Q: Apples are a sign of the seasonal shift. What is your favorite savory preparation?

I like to use MFC Granny Smith Apples freshly shaved or julienned, then tossed in little RSS Lemon Juice to finish a dish like pork chops or roasted chicken. The sweet/sour flavors and raw crispness give earthy dishes some balance.

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Indian Dishes

Q: What Indian dishes do you recommend? What spices and produce items are in these?

My favorite at the moment is roasting sweet potatoes, parsnips, butternut squash cubes, turnips, and RSS Garlic tossed in oil and garam masala spice. When tender, I mix these root vegetables with a crispy puri, tamarind chutney, RSS Lime Juice, and RSS Washed & Trimmed Cilantro to finish.

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Using Fresh Herbs

Q: What are your favorite fresh herbs? How do you use them?

I use RSS Cilantro to finish dishes and give them a pop of flavor. I also like to use ingredients from root to seed. For example, I serve a shaved fennel root salad garnished with the green fronds and a sprinkle of the pollen. Carrot tops give pleasant bitter notes to pesto. I also use them to garnish roasted MFC Carrots and MFC Shredded Carrot salads.

Good eating!

Chef: David Evans
Markon Member Chef

Grilled Produce Items

Q: It’s grilling season—what are your favorite produce items on the grill?

Chefs are now pulling away from the more traditional grilling items like asparagus and zucchini. I suggest using grill pans to give cruciferous vegetables such as pre-blanched RSS Brussels Sprouts, MFC Kalettes, and RSS Broccoli Florets a deeply charred flavor. I also like to marinate par-boiled and sliced sweet potatoes with soy sauce and mirin, then grill for a sweet yet savory taste. The key is to get adventurous.

Good eating!

Chef: Chris Casson
Markon Member Chef

Late-Summer Veggies

Q: What is your favorite late-summer vegetable? How do you serve it?

I love beets, corn, and kale for menus that need to bridge the hot summer with the impending fall months. Seal skin-on baby beets in foil with sea salt, RSS Peeled Garlic, RSS Sliced Onions, and fresh herbs. Drizzle with oil—I like coconut oil because of the high temperatures of the grill—and roast on the coals until tender and the skins slip right off. I prefer raw or slightly sauteed kale preparations to preserve the crunch. And there is no better time for sweet corn than late summer. Char on the grill with butter, garlic, and cilantro—and serve with crumbled Mexican queso.

Good eating!

Chef: Chris Casson
Markon Member Chef